Faux Jellyfish

When Sea Turtles
Overdose on Plastics

When scientists, marine biologists and environmentalists learned that a juvenile sea turtle was found dead off the coast of Argentina, most already knew the cause: digestive blockage.
That is because more and more turtles are dying today from ingesting too much plastic, which they often mistake by jellyfish. An examination of the gastrointestinal obstruction in a green turtle found off Florida discovered that the animal had swallowed 74 foreign objects, including four types of latex balloons and several types of hard plastic.
What such increasing occurrences show is the staggering amount of debris being dumped into the oceans worldwide. It’s also the reason for the existence of something so repugnant such as the Great Pacific Gyre, a patch of garbage the size of Texas, composed of various types of plastic. But as disgusting as it is, there isn’t any serious effort in progress to eliminate it.
Even if it were, it wouldn’t make much of a difference. Ocean pollution seems to be intrinsic to our idea of civilization. The more we produce, the more we waste. And now unfortunately, almost every marine species has become used to consume the array of non bio-degradable debris we dump into the water.
Thus that patch of junk, with its estimated 3.5 million items of detritus, ranging from toys to toothbrushes, has a better chance to last for millions of years than the sea turtles, who’re thought to have already been living that long on this earth.
As for us and our blind faith on everything plastic, it may not take evolution even a fraction of that time to choose us to be the ones to be thrown away. Next thing we know, we may found ourselves swirling aimlessly in some gigantic merry-go-round garbage patch.

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