Thanksgivukkah

A Holiday Combo
& a Smashed Comet

It happened before and, if you’re not in a hurry, it’ll happen again. Good luck with that, though. And good luck with one of the most loaded of the American holidays, both celebrated and vilified for its special brand of family time, the kind that often verges on murder.
Thanksgiving, which after Thursday, will only conflate with Hanukka again in the year 79811, is being called Thanksgivukkah this time around, in what Wikipedia insists is a portmanteau but that’s not for reasons we’re sure our illustrious readership knows so well.
As if eating overfed, extra-hormone stuffed, hardly a bird at this point at all, turkey were not enough, we’re already feeling lazy and not up to the task to add yet another exquisite commentary to the joyous occasion (for some, naturally, not the turkeys).
After some three years, we did accumulate a nice share of posts on the subject, which we’ll proceed to lay on your plate, as you try to ignore the grand debate on healthcare and how ‘that Kenyan is ruining this country,’ while at the same time trying not to call attention to your text messaging.
Feel free to jump in with congratulatory asides and additional servings of praise for our foresight, which will only require a few tweaks, perhaps a dollop of the salsa du jour for flavor, and a few minutes in the microwave. Just like the leftovers you’re sentenced to have for the next several days.
For there’s little about this holiday that’s new and fresh, and this year particularly, the pickings are indeed slim. You have your White House sanctioned turkey pardons, the appalling conditions consumer-bound poultry is handled in this country and the need to raise them more humanely, and the multitude of well-intentioned souls who decide to go vegan at this time of the year out of sheer disgust.
But there’s something else going on, that may be important for astrophysics and scientists: a comet is about to zip by, head and tail, the sun. ISON, as it’s known, has been so far a disappointment all on its own, though. Earlier reports that it’d offer a stunning sky show have been greatly downgraded since.
Thus there’s little hope for you but to dive yourself among your family and friends, and hey, it doesn’t have to be a drag. In fact, you should see how unimpressed, for over two centuries now, the world around us is about that dog-eared tale of pilgrims and natives cozying it up together.
And so would probably be them too. In other words, if these days everybody seems to be pissed, pardon our Wampanoag (it’s alright, we’ll wait for you to check the link), it’s fair to say that it all may have started with that shared meal and how it opened the way for a series of cultural slaughters.
Still, it’s the first day of Hanukkah which, in itself, is reason for millions of people around the world to be hopeful for an entire week. And a comet is still a comet, Halley be damned for having set the bar so high in the 1880s and failed to repeat its own performance a century later.
Talking about repeats, no one around will see them coming back, neither Halley nor ISON, the same way that no one living today will be lighting daily candles e eating a combo of turkey and latkes the next time this will be possible. Coming to think of it, this Thanksgiving did manage to bring something new to our jaded spirits. So have a nice one.
__________
Read Also:
* Meatless Time
* Naked Meal
* No Thanks to You

Advertisements

One thought on “Thanksgivukkah

  1. WordsFallFromMyEyes says:

    Halley be damned :). I do love your writing.

    You say it so well that the turkeys are so hormone stuffed they’re hardly meat at all but some kind of distortion. Thanksgivukkah & happy comets to you.

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s