Moon Shadow

Here Comes the Darken Sun,
But Let’s Just Say, It’s Alright

So the great solar eclipse of 2017 is coming to America and we, for ones, are only too glad about it. What, with all that’s going on, the thought of spending time with such a fascinating cosmic event surely beats most of everything one’s been watching on the news lately.
By now, however, every media, the Internet, your close friends, and even your deranged uncle Bob, have already told you all that is to know about it, maybe more. So here’s just a few historical and/or interesting pics to entice and inform you. Call it your personal mini visual tour.
Hover over the photos and click on them and on the links, for data and stories. Eclipses have been teaching us since time immemorial, and while many feared that the sun, or the moon, wouldn’t survive the penumbra, others like Edmond Halley, were open to learn. The one in 1919, for instance, proved Einstein’s Theory of Relativity.

The one visible in 1966 at the bottom of South America led NASA to launch 12 rockets from a beach some 30 miles from where a little boy risked losing his eyesight to watch it through a photo negative strip. Luckily, that pair of eyes survived to experience many others since.

All ancient civilizations studied and documented cosmic phenomena. Comets and meteors, supernovas and moon eclipses, all had tremendous impact on our history on this planet. But things heat up considerably whenever the sun is concerned, and when the day turns into night, well, that’s not to be ever taken lightly.

We gaze, therefore we are. To many of us, this may be our very last solar eclipse, so we’d better make it good, just in case. Choose well your eye wear, pick a good spot, and make up a decent excuse to be there. Gee, the way things are going, the sun coming back after just a few hours may be the best news we may be getting for a while.

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* Tomorrow Never Knows

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One thought on “Moon Shadow

  1. My Norwegian cousin’s son and I were in Paris for the 1999 eclipse. On a trip of art galleries and museums, we didn’t even know what day it was happening till we were walking towards the Louvre and saw people with dark film and cardboard viewers. We certainly didn’t know the centre of Paris was directly in line for a full eclipse, till an eerie silence fell on the city and all the birds ceased singing, as the skies darkened. Traffic stopped. Unbelievably, we’d arrived at the Pyramide du Louvre directly in front of the museum. Had we not been there, we would not have been able to watch the eclipse happening as we had no eye protection. Instead, we were able to view its reflection in the glass pyramid.

    Liked by 2 people

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