Super Snitching

Daily Planet Defends
Legendary Reporter

A tweet of artist Daniel Picard with a photo that supposedly shows Batman as the author of the graffiti that accused the reporter Clark Kent of being Superman, unwittingly made Perry White, the Daily Planet’s Chief Editor, the main news of his own newspaper this week. The shy but well regarded Kent is a longtime staff writer at the Planet.
The graffiti showed up on several Metropolis buildings two days ago, and began trending on social media. Both Kent and Superman were advised not to speak publicly about the matter, according to sources. But scrutiny by the city’s press corps and late-night chatter on talk shows threatened Perry’s own position at the Planet.
In an official note, he called the rumor ‘fake news.’ However, the stunning picture of Batman in the very act of scrawling the message put pressure on the Planet‘s editorial board. Hundreds of commentaries and posts on Twitter, Facebook and other social media, are questioning the authenticity of the photo, and Picard is yet to explain its provenance. Some posters are accusing Perry of having hired the artist to ‘stage’ the picture and embarrass Batman.
Gotham Gazette, main paper of Batman’s city, also got dragged into the controversy, but hasn’t yet published anything about the matter on its pages. According to Perry, the rumor is ‘irresponsible,’ and represents a ‘threat to the security of citizens of Metropolis.’ The Planet ‘makes itself available’ to Commissioner James Gordon, the city’s chief of police, to help in the investigations, the note concludes.
The Twitter picture, which is being examined for possible manipulation by police forensics experts, shows a high level of technical precision, usually not accessible to anyone outside official minting agencies and law enforcement. A parallel investigation is also being launched to find out the identity of its author, since Picard doesn’t sign it on his tweet.
Rivalry between Superman and Batman already sowed tensions among officials of both Metropolis and Gotham City, and in at least one occasion, caused a major conflict of residents of the two cities. In 1978, during an Independence Day parade, citizens got into a massive public brawl, that resulted in two casualties and dozens of injuries. Since then, the superheroes have avoided appearing together in public.
Periodically, rumors surface about the civilian identity of the two most popular American heroes, and the names of Kent, for the Man of Steel  – a native of the planet Krypton –  and Bruce Wayne, a wealthy Gotham philanthropist, for the Cape Crusader, are often mentioned. Even as no one has proven it, there’s consensus that law enforcement and official authorities are aware of their secret identities.
News about this issue will be published as soon as it becomes available.

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Read Also:
* The Daily Planet
* Super-Dupers 
* Warped Worlds

© Photos by Daniel Picard. All rights reserved.


Super Dupers

Who’s Afraid of Batman,
Superman & Spiderman?

There was a time, around WWII, that we got so scared about what we could do to ourselves, that we’ve resorted to an ancient device: to create incorruptible alter egos. They would be everything we’d like to believe our true nature was, noble, altruistic, always right. Plus they also had what we possibly couldn’t: supernatural powers.
At least, that was supposed to be their subtext. Superman, Batman, and other heroes conceived around that time, were all physically and morally powerful, and would never compromise. And neither would Spiderman, himself more a creature of the 1960s, full of self doubt and insecurities. Combined, they convey a pretty good picture of how we saw ourselves during the 20th century.
It’s too bad, then, that the more we flesh them out now, and imbue their myth with depth and gravitas, the more they recede toward the improbability and wind up helpless to cope with our way more complex reality. The trick worked for a while, but now its secret is out, and we’d no longer feel safe having one of them running around this side of the screen.
The more Hollywood reboots them, to please newly acquired sensibilities, the more it becomes clear that what they really embody is our fear, and as such, we don’t know which one is the scariest, whether the masked stand-ins we’ve created to keep our own Continue reading

Business Advisory

Learning Tips From
Two Fictional Heroes

Super-heroes fulfill many needs that we may lack or don’t come easily through our prosaic existence, with their moral and physical strengths and altruistic dedication to better other people’s lives. Above all, we’re captivated when they beat the hell out of bad guys, save the girl in peril and blow stuff up.
Their personal narratives can also teach us a thing or two about the world of business and the leadership qualities necessary to succeed in it, according to writers Nattyb and Alex Knapp, who see valuable lessons from the lives of, respectively, billionaire Bruce Wayne, crime-fighting Batman’s secret identity, and the intergalactic U.S.S. Enterprise Starship’s Captain James T. Kirk.
It turns out, behind the adventures of these two beloved fictional heroes, there’s a whole sense of ethics and purpose that guides them through very hairy situations without a scratch on their moral rectitude. We can’t emulate their extraordinary accomplishments, but we may indeed learn how they do what they do to remain perennial lighthouses to our own paths. It also helps that neither has superpowers.
A lot of this imagined workbook of tips and practical advice for the business novice could’ve also been gathered from the bag of tricks of any successful entrepreneur in the real world, from Steve Jobs, to Warren Buffett, to Bill Gates, to Richard Branson, to that guy your own kid thinks you are. Plus, of course, exquisite costumes and a box full of wonderful toys.
The idea though, without over-psychoanalyzing the power of heroes, fairy tales and all that, is to show that anyone can don a cape, or TV makeup, and make believe they’re destined to save mankind from its wrong ways. At the end of the day, though, what few do manage to accomplish is to imprint the world with their humanity, with their Continue reading