Invisible Beings

Tip for Praisers & Dismissers of
God or Jesus: Courts Ignore You

Given the circumstances, God has nothing to complain about. After all, being such a busybody, the fact that more people seem to be unhappy with their lives, something they attribute to divine creation, shouldn’t come as a surprise. These days, someone is always trying to sue god.
But while restraining orders have been placed against the father, the son gets considerably more sympathy. Jesus is generally seen either as a naive chap, crushed by the world, or a marketing genius, with shrewd PR skills. Some are even accepting that, grasp, he was not white.Touristic Attraction: <em>Ecce Homo</em> (Touristic Attraction- Elías García Martínez,1930) & Cecilia Giménez's Infamous 2012 Restoration
God, as John Lennon put it on a song, is a concept by which we measure our pain, an insight so weighty he felt the need to repeat it. It’s the same song that contains the dream is over verse, a fitting epitaph for the 1960s, the love and peace era, ruled by the hippie Superstar Jesus.
God is dead, declared Friedrich Nietzsche in the 1880s, a memo that huge swaths of believers are yet to get. While they won’t give the thought the time of the day, the universal search for diverse models of moral rectitude upon which to base one’s lives, has cost many theirs, truly.
An inventory of all tragic, vicious, terrible things done in the name of either God or Jesus (check his obituary), throughout history, as well as lots of good, too, could go here. We’ll write a detailed post about it once the two parallel tracks meet, and members of both camps depose their weapons.

COTTAGE INDUSTRY OF SUING GOD
This week, David Shoshan joined a long and qualified list of those who’ve taken God to court: he filed a restraining order, claiming the almighty treated him badly. Who hasn’t felt that way? The judge threw his suit out, advising him to seek help from the medical establishment.
Better excuse was given to Nebraska Senator Ernie Chambers, in 2008: the defendant has no earthly address. It turns out, like any celebrity, the superduper has an unlisted number. The court, despite acknowledging God itself, could not properly notify him. Case dismissed.
Insurance companies routinely invoke An act of god, to justify denying coverage, so both dismissals sit on shaky judicial ground. Others have been no luckier, from Jews suing for the Holocaust, (more)
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Read Also:
* The 2.000 Year Old
* Saving Themselves
* Curb Your God
Continue reading

Bloody Throes

The Hiroshima Reminder
& the Age of New Killings

Capping a few particularly blood-drenched weeks for thousands of civilians around the world, today’s the 69th anniversary of the mass killing of almost two hundred thousand residents of Hiroshima, by the first ever U.S. atomic bomb attack. It sealed the end of the World War 2 and started the nuclear age.
Meanwhile, Israel’s has withdrawn for now its ground troops from Gaza, but bombs continue to rain over Ukraine and Iraq. Plus, 100 years ago last Monday was the beginning of WW1, while around the same time, 50 years later, the first American combatants were sent to Vietnam. Blood soaked time, indeed.
Yet, for a breed of beings that’s been waging war since its inception on this planet, we’re surprisingly coy to call this game of mutual extermination for what it is. When it comes to rile up the troops and send them to the slaughtering fields, we’re often like bad parents, and lie to them that it won’t hurt. But it always does.
We insist in giving the carnage a catchy name, and promise it won’t last, but it always does, no matter how jazzed up the latest campaign is marketed to be. Remember ‘Shock and Awe?’ Almost like what the schoolyard bully would promise to do with us, at the end of the classes.
The writer H.G. Wells, best known as one of the forefathers of modern sci-fi literature, could’ve spared his legacy from a tragic miss, when he gave that first international conflict a pompous sobriquet: ‘the war to end all wars.’ 37 million dead, and two decades later, he couldn’t believe the world was ready to have another go at it.
To bury Japan’s imperial dreams of taking over where Hitler’d left off, the U.S. leveled two entire cities – Nagasaki was destroyed three days later, with almost another hundred thousand killed -, using atomic power, and justified it by claiming that such a power could not be topped, and it’d be forever a deterrent against war.

WHERE LIFE’S CHEAP, WAR’S MOST FOUL
And yet, many more followed. Speaking of justification, the Vietnam War, perhaps the most traumatic conflict the U.S. got ever involved, was triggered Aug. 4, 1964, with a confrontation with North Vietnamese forces at the Gulf of Tonkin, by covertly operating American ships.
The incident prompted Congress to give an unfortunate carte blanche to President Lyndon Johnson, and later Richard Nixon, to escalate a war that even now remains difficult, to well, justify. Coincidentally, Nixon signed the end of the war in 1973, and resigned from office 40 years ago this coming Saturday.
What we didn’t know then was that the only thing that the atomic bomb could possibly sustain was fear. Out of it, another war lingered, the Cold one, just enough to reset borders and redesign political alliances. Once we were done with it, Continue reading

Curtain Raiser

Speaking of Known Evils, Colltalers

The two brutal events that have seized worldwide headlines this past week – the newest flareup in the age-old Israeli-Palestinian conflict, and the downing of the Malaysian commercial airline over Ukraine – have visited their victims with the prospect of a lifetime of grief and regret.
To everyone else not directly involved, however, even a qualified analysis of these tragedies can become a minefield of self-important punditry and rancorous radicalism. To navigate such a path with a minimal sense of justice and impartiality is simply no longer an option.
The magnitude of these events have also the ability of covering up, even if only for the duration of a 24h news cycle, all other tragic, ongoing miseries festering around the world, from the street trenches of Aleppo, to raging firefights in Kabul, to the Central American refugee children crisis in the U.S., to widespread hunger, poverty, and environmental woes that won’t fail to exact their grim tolls, just because we aren’t looking.
After all, it is all too human to prioritize our attention, and set sights on a few targets at a time. That doesn’t exempt or redeem anyone from the objectionable crime of dozing off or zooming out of the catastrophes all around us, so to get some sleep, literally or figuratively.
But even invoking the word human seems out of place, when you think about the ferocious shelling of Gaza, incited or provoked as it may have been by the Hamas or the Israeli extreme right, or to count among the victims of Flight MH17, dozens of children and important AIDS activists.
That’s when tragedy crushes our tenuous grip on reality and reaches out to a realm of pure, unjustifiable and hopelessly irredeemable terror, and any attempt to make sense out of ruthless fate or shameless political motivation is not just utterly naive, but also absolutely abhorrent.
We can’t avoid rushing to judgement based on the emotional jolt we all felt upon learning that some 300 travelers may have been blown out of the sky by mistake, at the very least, or because of some downright evil calculation. Nor can we stop ourselves from jumping at possibly the wrong conclusions when picturing people running for shelter in Tel Aviv, or trapped in Gaza, with no way to hide from the raining bombs.
Taken apart, however, these two sources of incredible heartache gracing our thoughts today have little in common, beside their complexity and deep roots. And, obviously, the apparent lack of any short term solution in the horizon, which signals to their long lasting endurance.
To avoid jumping at rushed conclusions about Israel and the Palestinians, one needs to look farther back into the past. It’s hard to pick a breaking point, though, Continue reading