Kicking Tires

How We May Spend Our Lives
Before Something Else Happens

Socrates got it. A great number of scientists get it. Even Christians, Muslims and Jews often get it too. Most of what we do from the moment we wake up to the moment we go back to bed is a disguised effort to shield us from one thought: we’ll all going to die, regardless if in fifty years or right after we finish this anguishing sentence.
But cheer up; such desire of winning over the inexorable impermanence of our days on Earth may only lend meaning to our achievements as a species. From forming a family to building a tower, from writing books to curing diseases, we’ll all outlive our flesh and blood by the sheer reach of our deeds, and the ability to live on through our kin.
While our faith in the future is conditioned by what we choose to believe, either being the elaborate dogma of religion, or the unwavering pursuit of a notable life, we’ve been around the block a few times to know when such beliefs are enough to give our lives depth, and when such invisible power ceases to have any relevance.
It’s futile to complain about the brevity of our time here. Much wiser is to contemplate the miseries of the human body when it grows old and frail and sick. For our experience to last longer, we can always borrow that of those who came before, and turn them into our own shared Continue reading